It’s Thanksgiving week so it seems like the perfect time to talk about gratitude.  There is a lot of research within the past decade about the benefits of gratitude.  Let’s first level set on the definition of gratitude -- “the quality of being thankful.”  Many of the clients with whom I work are looking for new jobs, different jobs, or jobs that allow them to do more of what they love.  But finding that dream job does not occur overnight.  It takes time, a bit of patience, and a lot of persistence.  Ultimately, it leads to a payoff that yields thankfulness.   But what’s a person to do during the time he is looking for that more ideal role?  How do you stay motivated while making the play for your long-term goal?  It all begins with gratitude.  A study by Robert A. Emmons and Mike McCullough found that people who focus on gratitude felt better about their lives as a whole and were 25% happier than people who focused on the negative.  So that means there is a whole lot to be said for finding the joy in the work you are doing each day while you are looking to make a transition.  What does your level of gratitude look like when you think of your “daily grind”?  How can you focus more on the things and the people for whom you are thankful?   This does not mean you should stop pursuing work that aligns more clearly with your natural gifts.  It just means that you should look for the silver lining where you are while you are looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.   Lesley provides individualized coaching to professionals who are seeking greater satisfaction in their careers.  She helps clients uncover their God-given gifts, name their non-negotiable values, and align their career path with those gifts and values to have a greater impact on the world.  Lesley has helped professionals from many different fields, including IT, healthcare, and education.  If you are ready to create your personal mission statement and take action on living it out, contact Lesley   here   for a free live call to get you started.

It’s Thanksgiving week so it seems like the perfect time to talk about gratitude.  There is a lot of research within the past decade about the benefits of gratitude.  Let’s first level set on the definition of gratitude -- “the quality of being thankful.”

Many of the clients with whom I work are looking for new jobs, different jobs, or jobs that allow them to do more of what they love.  But finding that dream job does not occur overnight.  It takes time, a bit of patience, and a lot of persistence.  Ultimately, it leads to a payoff that yields thankfulness. 

But what’s a person to do during the time he is looking for that more ideal role?  How do you stay motivated while making the play for your long-term goal?  It all begins with gratitude.

A study by Robert A. Emmons and Mike McCullough found that people who focus on gratitude felt better about their lives as a whole and were 25% happier than people who focused on the negative.  So that means there is a whole lot to be said for finding the joy in the work you are doing each day while you are looking to make a transition.

What does your level of gratitude look like when you think of your “daily grind”?  How can you focus more on the things and the people for whom you are thankful? 

This does not mean you should stop pursuing work that aligns more clearly with your natural gifts.  It just means that you should look for the silver lining where you are while you are looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Lesley provides individualized coaching to professionals who are seeking greater satisfaction in their careers.  She helps clients uncover their God-given gifts, name their non-negotiable values, and align their career path with those gifts and values to have a greater impact on the world.  Lesley has helped professionals from many different fields, including IT, healthcare, and education.  If you are ready to create your personal mission statement and take action on living it out, contact Lesley here for a free live call to get you started.