I often find myself in these last days of the year talking about how it is the “end of the year”. It gives a feeling of finality and a sense of winding down and wrapping things up. While I am a huge fan of taking time to wind down, I think I (along with a lot of you) have fallen into the trap of believing that the end of the year is not a good time to start something new. We always wait until January to start our New Year's resolutions to start developing a new habit or to realign ourselves with what's really important to us. Yet, December is a great time for new beginnings. Advent is the beginning of a new liturgical year for the church. It can also be the beginning of something new for you.  So, why wait for January? When you examine what you want to accomplish in early 2018, there are steps you can take  right now  to set you up for success when the new calendar year turns over.  1.    How clear are you on what you want to accomplish?  2.    What are your thoughts on how you will achieve it?  3.    The next step is to outline what you will do in order to execute on the how – the specific plans or the details.  You may have a brand new goal in mind for next year that you have never attempted before. Or you may have a goal that shows up over and over again on your wish list but never actually gets accomplished. In either situation you must be able to clearly answer the three questions listed above before you will see that goal achieved.  If you are truly committed to your goal, I encourage you to engage someone to walk along this journey with you. Research has shown that you increase your chance of achieving a goal by 85% when you establish a relationship of accountability. An accountability partner can be a friend, a colleague, or you can invest in professional help from a coach.  Recently, while working with a client on expanding her support network as she makes a career transition, she shared 5 names of individuals with whom she felt very close. Upon asking her questions about what role she hoped these five individuals would play in her career goal, she shared that she wanted them to be able to listen and ask questions like a coach. Friends and colleagues are a valuable part of your support network and can serve as accountability partners, but they do not have the training and skillset needed to serve as an unbiased ear who can ask thought-provoking questions to help you achieve your end goal.  So, give some thought to the three questions above.  Then, invest in your goal by establishing an accountability partner.  Your 2018 will receive a kick-start, and you are extremely likely to achieve what you set out to accomplish.      Lesley provides individualized coaching to professionals who are seeking greater satisfaction in their careers.  She helps them uncover their God-given gifts, name their non-negotiable values, and align their career path with those gifts and values to have a greater impact on the world.  Lesley has helped professionals from many different fields, including IT, healthcare, and education.  Access Lesley’s    free self-assessment    to determine how well you recognize and use your God-given gifts!    

I often find myself in these last days of the year talking about how it is the “end of the year”. It gives a feeling of finality and a sense of winding down and wrapping things up. While I am a huge fan of taking time to wind down, I think I (along with a lot of you) have fallen into the trap of believing that the end of the year is not a good time to start something new. We always wait until January to start our New Year's resolutions to start developing a new habit or to realign ourselves with what's really important to us. Yet, December is a great time for new beginnings. Advent is the beginning of a new liturgical year for the church. It can also be the beginning of something new for you.

So, why wait for January? When you examine what you want to accomplish in early 2018, there are steps you can take right now to set you up for success when the new calendar year turns over.

1.    How clear are you on what you want to accomplish?

2.    What are your thoughts on how you will achieve it?

3.    The next step is to outline what you will do in order to execute on the how – the specific plans or the details.

You may have a brand new goal in mind for next year that you have never attempted before. Or you may have a goal that shows up over and over again on your wish list but never actually gets accomplished. In either situation you must be able to clearly answer the three questions listed above before you will see that goal achieved.

If you are truly committed to your goal, I encourage you to engage someone to walk along this journey with you. Research has shown that you increase your chance of achieving a goal by 85% when you establish a relationship of accountability. An accountability partner can be a friend, a colleague, or you can invest in professional help from a coach.

Recently, while working with a client on expanding her support network as she makes a career transition, she shared 5 names of individuals with whom she felt very close. Upon asking her questions about what role she hoped these five individuals would play in her career goal, she shared that she wanted them to be able to listen and ask questions like a coach. Friends and colleagues are a valuable part of your support network and can serve as accountability partners, but they do not have the training and skillset needed to serve as an unbiased ear who can ask thought-provoking questions to help you achieve your end goal.

So, give some thought to the three questions above.  Then, invest in your goal by establishing an accountability partner.  Your 2018 will receive a kick-start, and you are extremely likely to achieve what you set out to accomplish.

 

Lesley provides individualized coaching to professionals who are seeking greater satisfaction in their careers.  She helps them uncover their God-given gifts, name their non-negotiable values, and align their career path with those gifts and values to have a greater impact on the world.  Lesley has helped professionals from many different fields, including IT, healthcare, and education.  Access Lesley’s free self-assessment to determine how well you recognize and use your God-given gifts!